Institutionalization: The Issue

Background of the Issue

In Canada, the number of seniors receiving care in LTC homes has risen from 203,000 in 1986 to 240,000 in 1996 (National Advisory Council on Aging, 1999) and this number is continuing to increase. Projections for 2031 suggest that the number of LTC beds will triple or even quadruple.

The literature suggests that there is an extremely high prevalence of mental disorders among nursing home residents. Depression is extremely common (15% – 25% of residents have symptoms of major depression) as is the prevalence of psychosis (ranging from 12-21%). Individuals with dementia suffer from cognitive impairment (usually consisting of memory impairment) may also have behavioural symptoms which include agitation, aggression, wandering, etc. Due to the high prevalence of mental disorders, studies have demonstrated limited availability of psychiatric and mental health services for residents living in Canadian LTC homes (Conn & Silver, 1998; Conn et all, 1992.

Excerpt from National Guidelines for Seniors’ Mental Health: Mental Health Issues in Long Term Care Homes (Focus on Mood and Behaviour Symptoms) Retrieved January 2009 from Canadian Coaliation for Seniors Mental Health Website.


Resources

National Guidelines for Seniors’ Mental Health: Mental Health Issues in Long Term Care Homes (Focus on Mood and Behaviour Symptoms) Retrieved January 2009 from Canadian Coaliation for Seniors Mental Health Website.

Physical Design Dimensions of an Elder-Friendly Hospital